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New Jersey Warehouseman
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News

February 1, 2017

NJWMA offers 401(k) Plan as Member Benefit

The New Jersey Warehouseman & Movers Association is pleased to announce a new member benefit; one that can help licensed mover members and their employees plan for retirement.  With Transamerica Retirement Solutions, we proudly offer members access to a 401(k) employer plan! Transamerica services more than $152 billion in plan assets for over 25,000 plans, including more than 260 multiple employer plans with over 10,200 adopting employers.

 

By adopting the NJWMA Retirement Plan, movers and their employees and even 1099 contractors will have access to many new and enhanced retirement plan features, such as:

 

·         Plan design flexibility: a custom retirement plan can be developed to fit your employee demographics and unique business needs.

·         Robust selection of investment choices: the fund lineup includes investments and target date solutions from prominent management companies such as American Funds, Fidelity, RidgeWorth, and Janus to name a few.2

·         Reduced retirement plan administration: NJWMA has arranged for a Third Party Administrator, TAG Resources, and Transamerica to provide a significant amount of the retirement plan administration, leaving you free to operate your business. 

·         Reduced costs: NJWMA has negotiated a volume discount for our members. Your business can potentially realize reduced expenses for retirement plan audits, plan testing, annual reporting, document preparation, and participant statement costs.

·         Reduced liability: the majority of tasks that are TYPICALLY the responsibility of an employer will be handled on your behalf.

·         Online account management: employees can manage their accounts, perform transactions, view account balances, change deferral percentages, check fund performance, and more — all online. 

·         Participant education support: you will also have access to a wide array of award-winningtools and resources to enroll and educate your employees and participants.  Fully licensed financial advisors are available to NJWMA members to guide them through the program.

 

The New Jersey Warehouseman & Movers Association  is dedicated to meeting the ever-changing needs of our members and aims to offer you access to the most competitive programs, products, and services available in the marketplace today. We encourage you to review and adopt our NJWMA Retirement Plan.  Find details in the Members Only section of our website.

 

 

Use These Questions to Make an “Apples to Apples” Comparison of the Companies You Talk to About Your Move

How long have you been in business?

Will you provide me with your required federal USDOT and Motor Carrier (MC) numbers, as well as your required Public Mover license to perform moves within New Jersey?

Do you have testimonials from satisfied clients?

Do you only use trained professionals instead of casual labor?

Will your company actually perform the move or will it be performed by another moving company?

Is your company an accredited member of the Better Business Bureau with an A+ rating?

Do you maintain all the required insurance including Workers Compensation insurance? 

Are you an active member of the American Moving & Storage Association and the New Jersey Warehousemen and Movers Association, and do you follow their Code of Ethics? 

Are you a Pro-Mover awarded by the American Moving & Storage Association, or earned a similar award or recognition?

Are all of your employees subjected to a pre-employment screening including criminal background checks?

Will you provide a detailed, written estimate for the work specified?

Do you require a deposit?

 

January 2017

10 Steps to Hiring a Mover

  1. Get recommendations. Ask friends, coworkers, and local real estate agents.

 

  1. Do an initial screening. When you have a list of recommended movers, go online and check with NJWMA – NJ Warehousemen and Movers Association (njmovers.com; Better Business Bureau bbb.org; and American Moving and Storage Association moving.org ) to see if a moving company is a member, which means it is licensed, insured and has agreed to abide by a set of ethical standards and practices

 

  1. You should end up with three companies to call for an in-home estimate. Estimates for interstate moves will be based on the weight and mileage. Intrastate moves are usually based on time and material.

 

  1. When an estimator comes to your home, show him everything you want to have moved?in the closets, the backyard, the basement, the attic.
  2. Review the estimate. Ask questions. If you are unclear about anything now is the time to ask. If you want to purchase additional insurance from your mover (above the standard 60 cents a pound that the mover’s insurance covers), make sure you understand the costs and details of that coverage.
  3. As you get estimates, ask each mover the same questions so you can compare accurately. (sample attached)
  4. When you’ve gotten all your estimates in, compare the bids. Be wary of any company that comes in much lower than the others. Look at high bids to see where the extra costs are coming from. Call and ask questions if you don’t understand anything.
  5. Now check out the contenders in more detail. Take the information you’ve gathered and get back online and check reviews. See what others have to say.
  6. Make sure your moving company has the license and insurance it needs to move you legally. Yes, there are movers who solicit business without the legal authority to do so. We can’t stress how important this step is for your protection.

10. Now you can select a mover. You should feel confident about any company you’ve run through the checks above. Confirm the dates and details of your move, and make sure you get a signed order for service and a bill of lading.

 

NJWMA Movers Work with Move For Hunger for Winter Food Drive Ideas

12/28/2016   The holiday season is winding down, but the fight against hunger is a year-round battle. One in 5 children in the United States struggle with food insecurity every day of the year, and we all need to do what we can to help keep the shelves stocked at our local food banks/pantries. Here are three food drive theme ideas to help get you started.

Continue reading

 

NJ Division of Consumer Affairs Nabs 21 Unlicensed Movers in Undercover Sting

NEWARK – 12/16/2016   The Division of Consumer Affairs today announced it has cited 21 unlicensed moving companies and fined each $2,500, following “Operation Mother’s Attic,” a covert sting in which Division investigators posed as consumers to catch moving companies suspected of operating without a license.

The undercover initiative was conducted in late October at a public storage facility in Bernardsville, where movers advertising on various websites were booked for a “job” transporting personal possessions from the storage facility to another location in the state.

During the five-day sting, several movers a day pulled up at the designated “job” site and were met by Division investigators, agents of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), a transportation compliance unit of the New Jersey State Police (NJSP), and the Somerset County Sheriff’s Office.

In addition to the Notices of Violations (NOVs), the sting resulted in seven arrests by NJSP for possession of marijuana under fifty grams and one outstanding traffic warrant. Three individuals were detained for ICE violations.

“Public movers are often granted unfettered access to consumers’ homes, and entrusted with their most valuable possessions.  To protect consumers from fraud and other risks, we must make sure these individuals are properly vetted and regulated through our licensing system,” said Attorney General Christopher S. Porrino.  “Operation Mother’s Attic is a proactive approach to weeding out and penalizing unlicensed movers who are operating outside the Division’s oversight.” 

“Unscrupulous moving companies can be a nightmare for consumers,” said Steve Lee, Director of the Division of Consumer Affairs.  “From negligently destroying valuable property to holding possessions hostage in exchange for exorbitant price increases, these bad actors can wreak havoc on people’s lives.  The best way to avoid predatory movers is to make sure the companies you hire are licensed and in compliance with our consumer protection laws.”

State law requires all intrastate movers (those performing residential moves that both begin and end in New Jersey) to be licensed by the Division of Consumer Affairs.  These movers must also protect consumers' goods by maintaining cargo liability insurance, workers' compensation insurance, and bodily injury and property damage insurance.  They must register each moving vehicle they use in New Jersey, and keep the vehicles properly marked and insured, in compliance with State regulations.  Movers also must provide consumers with a written estimate of the costs of the move.  There are approximately 270 licensed intrastate movers in New Jersey.

The companies issued an NOV and $2,500 civil penalty are:  

  • QMS PLUS PRO MOVERS, Paramus, NJ
  • HOUSE MOVERS, Secaucus, NJ
  • ARON DAY MOV. & DELIVERY, Nyack, NY
  • M&M MOVING & STORAGE, Woodland Park, NJ
  • ABC MOVING SERVICES, Phillipsburg, NJ
  • MOBILE MOVERS, Helmetta, NJ
  • RELOCATION SOLUTION MOVING, Old Bridge, NJ
  • SJS MOVING & TRANSPORTATION, Rahway, NJ
  • RUSH HOUR MOVING, Marlton, NJ
  • ROUND ONE MOVING, Trenton, NJ
  • SMART MOVE INDUSTRIES, Clifton, NJ
  • TOP MOVERS, Linden, NJ
  • R&B MOVERS, Runnemede, NJ
  • ACTION PIANO MOVING, New City, NY
  • KEYBOARD EXPRESS, Toms River, NJ
  • GO TO M&S, Staten Island, NY
  • DELTA RELOCATION, Union City, NJ
  • ELVIS DIRT CHEAP MOVING, Philadelphia, PA
  • TOP SHELF MOVERS, Raritan, NJ
  • MORRISTOWN MOVING SERVICES, Waldwick, NJ
  • MOVING SOLUTIONS, Bayonne, NJ

Three other companies are under review by the Division as a result of the sting operation.

The assessed civil penalty for unlicensed operation will be reduced to $1,250 for any mover that applies for State licensure within 30 days of receiving the NOV.  Each mover also has the option of requesting mitigation to reduce the civil penalty or an administrative hearing to contest the Notice of Violation and civil penalty.

Advice for Consumers:

Before hiring a mover, review the tips available from the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs.  They include:

  • Call the Division of Consumer Affairs at 800-242-5846 to verify the license status of any mover you consider hiring.  Ask whether consumer complaints have been filed against the mover.
  • Obtain a written estimate from the mover you select.  The cost can be estimated on an hourly rate, by weight and miles traveled, or by cubic measurement.
  • Never pack jewelry, money, or valuable documents with your goods to be moved. The mover is not responsible for items of extraordinary value.
  • Check your goods as they are being delivered.  If any are lost or damaged, notify the mover immediately.  A damage claim can be filed up to 90 days after the move date.
  • Unless you purchase additional coverage, the mover is required to compensate you only up to 60 cents per pound, per article, for damages.

Chief Investigator Edward George, Supervising Investigator Murat Botas and Investigators Vincent Buonanno, Christopher Spaldo, Brian Morgenstern, Jesse Maneiro, Roger Hines, and Barby Menna, of the Division of Consumer Affairs’ Office of Consumer Protection, conducted this investigation.

Consumers who believe they have been cheated or scammed by a business, or suspect any other form of consumer abuse, can file a complaint with the State Division of Consumer Affairs by visiting its website or by calling 1-800-242-5846 (toll free within New Jersey) or 973-504-6200.

http://www.njconsumeraffairs.gov/News/Pages/12162016.aspx 

 

Electronic Documents Approved

The NJ Division of Consumer Affairs has finally approved the use of electronic documents, effective November 21, 2016 for intrastate moves. IMPORTANT: This rule does not change the requirement that movers must perform an in-person survey at least 24 hours prior to the date of the move, but after the survey, you can legally transmit the estimate or order for service and obtain signatures electronically. Note, the 24 hour rule does not apply to short notice moves.

Here are the rules regarding the use of electronic forms: 

SUBCHAPTER 4. GENERAL PROVISIONS 13:44D-4.1 Forms 

(a)-(e) (No change.) 

(f) Any of the documents required by N.J.A.C. 13:44D-4.2, 4.3, or 4.4 may be completed and stored in an electronic format. 

(g) A public mover and/or warehouseman who completes a document required by N.J.A.C. 13:44D-4.2(b) or (c), or 4.3(b) or (c), electronically pursuant to (f) above shall provide the consumer with a printout of the document at least 24 hours prior to the date of the move. 

(h) A public mover and/or warehouseman who completes a document electronically pursuant to (f) above shall sign the document electronically and shall ensure that the consumer provides electronic signatures on documents required by N.J.A.C. 13:44D-4.2(c), 4.3(c), or 4.4(a)4. 

(i) A warehouseman who completes a document required by N.J.A.C. 13:44D-4.4 electronically pursuant to (f) above shall provide the consumer with a printout of the document prior to rendering services.

 

Union County Mover Ordered to Pay $114,127.50 and Cease Business, Under Final Judgment- Action Brought By the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs

NEWARK – September 11, 2015: A Superior Court Judge has ordered that Just in Time Moving & Delivery Service, Inc., Just in Time Moving and Storage, Inc., and their principal, Haliru Gusau, be permanently enjoined from operating as a public mover and/or warehouseman in New Jersey, under terms of a Final Judgment and Order obtained in a summary action brought by the Division of Consumer Affairs.

Judge Thomas J. Walsh also ordered Gusau and his companies to pay $61,390 in civil penalties, restitution, attorneys’ fees and investigative costs after finding that they committed 23 violations of the Public Movers Licensing Act, Public Movers Regulations, Consumer Fraud Act and Advertising Regulations. Gusau, a resident of Roselle, and his companies also must pay $31,187.44 in civil penalties and $21,550.00 in consumer restitution, under terms of a March 29, 2005 Consent Order that he failed to honor. Further, Gusau and his companies continued to advertise, offer for sale, sell and/or perform mover’s services and/or storage services in New Jersey in violation of the Division’s March 30, 2007 Final Order of Discipline.

“Through this action, we have removed a chronic bad actor from the state’s moving and warehousing industry, thereby protecting consumers from fraud and other violations of the law,” Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman said. “We will not tolerate companies that continue to ignore laws meant to protect consumers.”

“The defendants continued to perform moving and storage services while being unlicensed to do so, and without having paid civil penalties and consumer restitution owed from 2005,” said Steve Lee, Acting Director of the Division of Consumer Affairs. “Through enforcement actions like this, we’re working to protect consumers when they hire companies to transport and warehouse their possessions.”

The Final Judgment and Order also provides for the permanent annulment of the corporate charters of Just in Time Moving & Delivery Service, Inc. and Just in Time Moving and Storage, Inc., as well as the immediate shut down of defendants’ website.

The State’s seven-count Complaint alleged that Gusau and his companies violated the Public Movers and Warehousemen Licensing Act, Public Movers Regulations, Consumer Fraud Act and/or Advertising Regulations by:

  • Advertising, offering for sale, selling and/or performing mover’s services and/or storage services in New Jersey without being licensed with the Division to do so;
  • Advertising, offering for sale, selling and/or performing mover’s services and/or storage services in New Jersey even after the Director of the Division revoked their license to do so;
  • Representing on the Just in Time Moving Website that they are licensed to perform mover’s services and/or storage services in New Jersey, when such is not the case; and
  • Representing on the Just in Time Moving Website that “Just In Time Moving has been one of the most reputable NJ local moving companies in the Tri-state area for years,” when such was not the case.

Investigator Vincent Buonanno in the Office of Consumer Protection within the Division of Consumer Affairs conducted the investigation of this matter.

Deputy Attorney General Alina Wells in the Division of Law’s Consumer Fraud Prosecution Section represented the State in this action.

Consumers who believe they have been cheated or scammed by a business, or suspect any other form of consumer abuse, can file anonline complaint with the State Division of Consumer Affairs by visiting its website or by calling 1-800-242-5846 (toll free within New Jersey) or 973-504- 6200.

 

8/14/2015  AMSA RESPONDS TO MOVING COMPLAINT 

Scott Michael, AMSA president and CEO, sent the following letter to the editor of 'The Hill' responding to a guest blog post about professional moving companies.

“In response to your article, “Little assistance for victims of moving companies,” the facts and data show that millions of Americans move every year and that the vast majority of professional moves end with happy customers. In fact, consumer complaints have actually declined recently.

According to data from the National Consumer Complaint Database, complaints about household goods moves fell almost 10 percent in 2014 from 2013. There were 2,824 total complaints recorded nationwide, down from 3,131. The Better Business Bureau also showed a drop in complaints against movers, from 7,306 in 2013 to 6,501, an 11 percent decrease.

This, out of an estimated 800,000 interstate moves handled by professional movers each year. And, in cases where claims are filed, 99.99 percent are successfully resolved before arbitration.

Still, any time someone has a bad experience with a mover is one time too many. The good news is that consumers have access to several options that can bring them relief: 

1. The American Moving & Storage Association offers neutral, third-party arbitration for customers of any of the association’s members for an interstate move. Learn more at www.Moving.org.
2. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration also offers arbitration options at ProtectYourMove.gov.
3. Or, go to MoveRescue.com and call the phone number listed for help.
 

One of the American Moving & Storage Association’s policy initiatives this year is for the Secretary of Transportation to establish a 24/7 nationwide, toll-free telephone number for consumers who need assistance when their household goods are held hostage by unscrupulous, uncertified movers. The program would leverage private sector resources, such asMoveRescue.com, to respond to consumer complaints that require immediate attention.

As the representative of the moving and storage industry, we believe that everyone who moves is entitled to strong consumer protections. In rare cases where there’s a dispute with a moving company, consumers should be confident they can turn to us or one of these other options for the help they need.”

 

 

 

7/21/2015  New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs Cites Eight Unlicensed Moving Companies that Targeted Asian and Latino Communities

NEWARK – Over this past year, the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs has been investigating unlicensed movers who were allegedly targeting Asian and Latino communities in New Jersey, often through foreign language newspapers. As part of this initiative, the Division is announcing the issuance of Notices of Violation to eight different moving companies. Each of these companies is being cited because it solicited customers or performed moving services in New Jersey, without being licensed by the Division of Consumer Affairs, as required by law.

The unlicensed moving companies cited by the Division targeted either predominantly Korean-speaking or Spanish-speaking communities, largely focusing on consumers who spoke little, if any, English. All eight of these cited companies have been assessed civil penalties, with the option to challenge these penalties or seek licensure.

"Moving from one residence to another can be a stressful and expensive experience, and can be even more difficult for those who do not speak English well," Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman said. "These consumers are largely unaware that these unlicensed companies are in violation of the law and are avoiding requirements designed to protect consumers from fraud and deceit."

"It is unacceptable for unlicensed moving companies to target those who do not speak English as their primary language." said Steve Lee, Acting Director of the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs. "The Division of Consumer Affairs will do everything it can to stop unlicensed and illegally operating moving companies from taking advantage of these consumers."

The eight companies issued Notices of Violation were identified either through internet postings or newspaper advertisements in which moving services were advertised exclusively in Spanish or Korean. For example, the advertisement for one unlicensed mover, Valverde's Moving, advertised mover's services in "El Cambio," a Spanish-language publication that is circulated in New Jersey, despite the fact that Valverde's Moving is not licensed as a public mover in the State. The eight companies who were issued Notices of Violations are as follows, with the owner and/or company official as noted:

  • Blumworld Moving, LLC (Sharod Thompson), Newark.
  • Canaan Express, Inc. (Sangsook Kim), Palisades Park.
  • Carlos Pato Movers, a/k/a "Carlos Pato Moving" (Carlos Pato), Newark.
  • Moo Goong Hwa Moving Corp. (Kwang S. Tony Kim), North Bergen.
  • Double Oh Seven, LLC, a/k/a "007 Moving, LLC" (Yong Ho Kim), Palisades Park.
  • GOM Cargo, LLC (Sungsu Kwan), Ridgefield.
  • KS General Services, d/b/a "Doremi Moving General Service" (Myeong Hie Choi), Ridgefield.
  • Valverde Brothers Corp., a/k/a "Valverde's Moving" (Guido Valverde), West New York.

Each Notice of Violation requires that the company pay a civil penalty of $2,500. The civil penalty can be reduced to $1,250 if the company submits an application to the Division for a Public Mover's license within 15 days.

Investigator Vincent Buonanno in the Division of Consumer Affairs' Office of Consumer Protection conducted the investigation, with assistance from the Union County Prosecutor's Office.

 

 

 

2/25/2015  New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs Cites 19 Unlicensed Movers 

NEWARK – The New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs is citing 19 unlicensed moving companies with violating state law, and assessing civil penalties of up to $2,500 each, as the result of an undercover sting operation.

Under the Division’s partnership with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), the sting also resulted in the arrest of several moving company employees allegedly were in the United States in violation of law.  – including one who had previous criminal convictions for sexual abuse of a minor and criminal possession of a loaded firearm.

“This sting operation – and our partnership with ICE and the New Jersey State Police – is protecting New Jerseyans from significant potential harm, even as it helps prevent consumer fraud,” Acting Attorney General John J. Hoffman said.  “Moving companies must comply with our laws. Consumers should learn as much as possible about any moving company – including learning whether it is registered – before entrusting its employees with their belongings.”

The sting operation took place in early November 2014.  It began with Consumer Affairs investigators who posed as consumers seeking to make an ordinary household move.  They booked appointments with unlicensed movers who used online listings to solicit work. 

The unlicensed companies sent moving crews to the location of the undercover investigators’ fictitious address in Wyckoff, and unwittingly into the second phase of the sting.  Upon arriving at the address, the unlicensed movers were inspected by Consumer Affairs investigators, as well as ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) officers, New Jersey State Police, and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA). 

“Too many consumers have been ripped off by movers who held their furniture and other goods hostage while demanding outrageously inflated prices,” Division of Consumer Affairs Acting Director Steve Lee said.  “Protecting consumers begins with our enforcement of New Jersey’s licensing laws.”

“The outstanding partnership between ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) and the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs once again demonstrates the necessity for law enforcement agencies to work in concert to keep our streets safe,” said John Tsoukaris, ICE ERO field office director. “ICE will continue to work with our law enforcement partners in New Jersey to arrest and remove convicted criminals and other priority aliens.”

State law requires all intrastate movers (those performing residential moves that both begin and end in New Jersey) to be licensed by the Division of Consumer Affairs.  They must protect consumers’ goods by maintaining cargo liability insurance, workers’ compensation insurance, and bodily injury and property damage insurance.  They must register each moving vehicle they use in New Jersey, and keep the vehicles properly marked and insured, in compliance with State regulations.  Movers also must provide consumers with a written estimate of the costs of the move. There are approximately 310 licensed intrastate movers in New Jersey.

Some statistics from the sting operation:

  • Nineteen companies face civil penalties of $2,500 each, for soliciting intrastate moves without the required New Jersey license.  If a company applies for State licensure within 30 days, this penalty will be reduced to $1,250.  Each company has the opportunity to contest the assertion that it violated the law.  To date, seven of the companies have paid penalty amounts totaling $12,500.  Two movers have become licensed, and two more have submitted applications for licensure.
  • ICE identified and arrested seven moving company employees who fell under the ICE priorities and who allegedly were in the United States in violation of law.  Three of these individuals had been previously convicted of crimes.  One individual from Ecuador had two DWI convictions; another from El Salvador had a conviction for sexual abuse against a minor, criminal possession of a loaded firearm and disorderly conduct.  Another individual from El Salvador, an MS-13 gang member, had a conviction for criminal attempted theft.  ICE is pursuing federal criminal prosecution for one of these individuals who was previously deported and allegedly had illegally reentered the United States.
  • The State Police arrested three moving company employees who were wanted on warrants for matters such as unpaid child support or unpaid traffic violations.
  • Two moving companies sent drivers who did not have valid driver’s licenses.
  • Despite the requirement that moving companies must use moving vehicles that are properly registered and insured, three companies sent Budget rental trucks.
  • Most of the companies solicited through online listings.  Ten used their own, often professional-looking websites. Seven used Craigslist and/or Angie’s List listings. The rest used other online venues.  Acting Director Lee noted that an attractive online listing does not mean a company is licensed or reputable.

Advice for Consumers:

Before hiring a mover, review the tips available from the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs. They include:

  • Call the Division of Consumer Affairs at 800-242-5846 to verify the license status of any mover you consider hiring. Ask whether consumer complaints have been filed against the mover.
  • An estimator is required by law to come to the consumer’s home to provide an estimate.
  • Obtain a written estimate from the mover you select. The cost can be estimated on an hourly rate, by weight and miles traveled, or by cubic measurement.
  • Never pack jewelry, money, or valuable documents with your goods to be moved.  The mover is not responsible for items of extraordinary value.
  • Check your goods as they are being delivered. If any are lost or damaged, notify the mover immediately. A damage claim can be filed up to 90 days after the move date.
  • Unless you purchase additional coverage, the mover is required to compensate you only up to 60 cents per pound, per article, for damages.

Team Leader Murat Botas and Investigators Vincent Buonanno, Oscar Mejia, and Ediz Laypan, of the Division of Consumer Affairs’ Office of Consumer Protection, conducted this investigation.

Deputy Attorneys General Natalie Serock and Erin M. Greene, of the Consumer Fraud Prosecution Section within the Division of Law, represented the State in this matter.

Consumers who believe they have been cheated or scammed by a business, or suspect any other form of consumer abuse, can file an online complaint with the State Division of Consumer Affairs by visiting its website or by calling 1-800-242-5846 (toll free within New Jersey) or 973-504- 6200.

october 27th

Choosing a Bad Mover

Most moving horror stories are a direct result of hiring a rogue or incompetent mover. How do you know you choose a bad mover?

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may 5th

Woman Sues Moving Company for Nightmare

A moving company referred a woman to a drug addict with a long rap sheet who stole her car and trashed her stuff, the miffed customer claims in court. Rebecca Chambers sued American Knights Moving and Storage in Harris County Court.

 

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april 30th

MAY IS MOVING MONTH: HERE ARE SOME EXCELLENT TIPS

Before you hire a mover do some research to avoid problems. Don't rely on prices quoted on the Internet or phone because they are subject to change on moving day!

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april 17th

Things you should know before hiring a moving company

We advise consumers to beware of rogue operators offering low estimates. They may have sophisticated websites to make them appear to be large legitimate companies. They make promises that they have no intention to keep and their final charges may be two to five times higher then the original estimate!

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january 13th

"Operation Mother’s Attic" Sting

NJ Division of Consumer Affairs Fines 26 Unlicensed Movers Nabbed in
Operation Mother’s Attic Sting

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april 29th

May is Mover Month - Public Service Announcement

IMPORTANT TIPS FOR NJ CONSUMERS

Toms River, NJ – May 1, 2015 –All Moving companies are required to be licensed. To perform intrastate moving within NJ, movers must be licensed by the NJ Division of Consumer Affairs. If you are moving interstate (from one state to another), the mover must also have a DOT and MC numbers issued by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. 

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march 25th

Moving Company Shut Down; $21.2 million assessed in penalties.

Two moving companies that provided low-ball estimates to consumers, and then held furniture and other moved possessions hostage if consumers refused to pay amounts significantly higher than the agreed-upon prices, have been assessed $21.2 million in civil penalties, consumer restitution and legal/investigative reimbursements to the State, under a Final Judgment by Default issued in State Superior Court, Passaic County.

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august 16th

DCA Charges 25 Unlicensed Movers in "Operation Mother's Attic II" Sting

Attorney General Jeffrey S. Chiesa and the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs are charging 25 unlicensed moving companies, and assessing fines of up to $2,500 each, resulting from “Operation Mother’s Attic II,” an undercover sting operation.

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may 10th

What happened when consumers did not use an NJWMA mover member:

2 N.J. moving companies accused of attempting to 'bait and switch' customers, then holding belongings hostage

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NJWMA
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Toms River, New Jersey 08753